Help the development of the site, sharing the article with friends!

Real walnut connoisseurs know: not all walnut trees are the same. There are many different varieties, some of which differ greatly in appearance, in terms of their climate and soil requirements, and in terms of the taste of their fruit. In the following, we will briefly present ten selected walnut tree varieties!

There are about 60 different types of walnut trees

Note: These are mainly German varieties that thrive really well in this country. Incidentally, real walnut (Juglans regia) served as the base for all refinements.

Geisenheim walnut

  • small-crowned variety
  • needs 60 to 80 square meters of space
  • is resistant to diseases
  • does not like too dry locations
  • sprouts relatively late
  • delicious fruits
  • regular income at a good level
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Moselan walnut

  • strong-growing, effective tree
  • needs 100 to 120 square meters of space
  • insensitive to late frost
  • thrives well even in dry conditions
  • nitrogen-rich soil is problematic
  • susceptible to marssonina and bacterial blight
  • prefers an airy location
  • large fruits with a fine taste
  • balanced harvests
  • relies on cross-pollination (requires another nearby walnut)

Weinheim walnut

  • medium to very strong growth
  • needs 70 to 80 square meters of space
  • sprouts relatively late
  • susceptible to Marssonina
  • feels good in loamy as well as in sandy soil
  • delicious fruits
  • good yields
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Spreewald walnut

  • medium-sized with a spherical crown
  • needs 70 to 80 square meters of space
  • sprouts early
  • sensitive to late frost (due to early growth)
  • susceptible to Marssonina
  • undemanding in terms of location and soil quality
  • tasty fruits
  • rich yields
  • Walnut kernels relatively oily (reduced shelf life)
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Weinsberg walnut

  • short-growing variety (crown diameter seven to eight meters)
  • needs 50 to 70 square meters of space
  • sensitive to late frost
  • solitary resistant to Marssonina and bacterial blight
  • large nuts with excellent taste
  • good yields
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Kurmarker Walnut

  • impressive growth with a broad crown
  • needs at least 100 square meters of space (not for smaller gardens)
  • Relatively frost-resistant (can also be cultivated in locations with low winter temperatures)
  • but: sensitive to late frost
  • also thrives in relatively damp locations
  • excellent fruits (among the best table varieties)
  • good yields
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Miracle of Monrepos

  • quite new variety, popular all over Europe
  • strong growth with a well-formed crown
  • robust (also suitable for climatically unfavorable locations)
  • resistant to Marssonina and bacterial blight
  • delicious fruits
  • good yields
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Seifersdorf Round

  • particularly undemanding tree (optimally adapted to the climatic conditions in Germany)
  • needs 65 to 80 square meters of space
  • resistant to Marssonina and bacterial blight
  • sensitive to late frost
  • medium-sized fruits with a wonderful taste
  • begins to bear fruit after four to six years of standing
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Franquette

  • from France
  • slow growing variety
  • likes calcareous soil
  • resistant to late frost (ideal for regions endangered by late frost)
  • little disease prone
  • big, tasty fruits
  • wears from the third year
  • is one of the most popular varieties

Red Danube Nut

  • from Austria
  • medium-sized with a spreading crown
  • needs 70 to 80 square meters of space
  • sensitive to late frost
  • susceptible to Marssonina
  • medium-sized, tasty fruits (red core as a special feature)
  • regularly rich yields
  • Self-pollinator (single tree suitability)

Help the development of the site, sharing the article with friends!

Category: