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Fuchsias are very popular and persistent summer bloomers, which are particularly striking due to the distinctive shape of their flowers. Originally from the rainforests of South America, the evening primrose family offers variety due to the variety of species and varieties, although not all fuchsias are hardy. In this article you will find out which fuchsia varieties are hardy in our climate and what you need to pay attention to when planting and caring for these gems.

Some fuchsia varieties are hardy

Proven hardy fuchsias

The overview below offers you an overview of recommended hardy fuchsia varieties, almost all of which are very old breeds - some dating back to the middle of the 19th century. These have proven themselves in German gardens to this day and are often planted. Of course, the list is not complete, as there are currently around 70 to 100 Fuchsia breeds that are hardy in our climate - apart from the mostly hardy wild forms or variants that are very similar to the wild forms such as Fuchsia magellanica, Fuchsia procumbens or Fuchsia regia.

variety blossom flower color leaves growth growth height
Alice Hoffman half filled light red / white bronze colored bushy, standing 30 to 60 cm
Ballerina blue simple red / medium blue dark green upright up to approx. 50 cm
Beacon pink simple pink dark green erect, richly branched 50 to 70 cm
Caledonia simple, very small light pink / light carmine dark green hanging up to approx. 50 cm
Cardinal Farges plain or semi-double Red White green upright 50 to 60 cm
Chillerton Beauty simple light pink / violet medium green erect, richly branched 70 to 90 cm
constance filled light pink / violet medium green erect, sometimes overhanging 45 to 60 cm
Delicate Blue simple white / dark purple dark green hanging up to approx. 30 cm
Delicate Purple simple dark pink / aubergine dark green hanging up to approx. 40 cm
Dirk Van Delen simple light pink / pink dark green upright up to approx. 60 cm
Empress of Prussia half filled red / violet dark green upright up to approx. 90 cm
exoniensis filled Red light green standing up to approx. 90 cm
Friends of Dortmund simple dark red / dark purple dark green bushy, upright up to approx. 50 cm
Madame Cornelissen half filled or filled cherry red / white dark green standing 60 to 80 cm
Beautiful Helena half filled creamy white / lavender strong green standing up to approx. 50 cm

Plant and care for hardy fuchsias

If you want to plant hardy fuchsias, pay particular attention to these points:

  • If possible, only plant strong, well-rooted specimens.
  • Planting is best done in June and July.
  • The fuchsias are placed in a trough about 20 centimeters deep.
  • This will be filled up by the following fall.
  • The deeper planting protects the sensitive roots.
  • In winter, even hardy plants always need winter protection!

For most hardy fuchsias, the parts of the plant above the ground will freeze back and should be cut back in early spring. The plants sprout again from the rootstock around April. An exception is Fuchsia regia, which does not freeze back, but sprouts from its wood again. Fuchsia regia is also much more resistant to frost than other fuchsia species.

tips

So-called dry freezing in winter can be a problem with hardy fuchsias, in which the plants can dry up due to a lack of soil moisture (e.g. in the case of frost).

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